• Categories

  • Marketing

    Coca-Cola Happiness Trucks delivering doses of happiness

    Check out the latest initiative in Coca-Cola’s Open Happiness campaign. Below are two clips of Coca-Cola trucks converted into happiness machines on wheels, dispensing balls, surfboards, frisbees - and, of course, refreshing Coke - on the streets of Rio de Janeiro and in the streets of Marikina in the Philippines.

    Where will happiness strike next?

    Print

    Alicia Keys and HP Launch “Everybody On” During the 2011 Grammy week

    Yesterday HP announced a new marketing campaign with the theme of “Everybody On”. It’s a global campaign that “celebrates how people around the world are using HP technology to pursue their personal and professional passions.”

    “Everybody On” embraces music, fashion, community activism, business, and more, according to HP. It is supported by an integrated campaign featuring print, broadcast, online, and social media. The launch will kick off with a minute-long TV spot featuring Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side”. The first in a series of TV spots will be launched during the Grammy Awards featuring Alicia Keys.

    Alongside Alicia Keys, the commercial also features HP laptops with Beats Audio. Not surprisingly, HP is also a sponsor of this years Grammy Awards, taking place in L.A. on 13 February.

    hp_alicia_keys_01

    The campaign itself was created by HP’s own Personal Systems Group, and build on its “The Computer is Personal Again” campaign.

    Print

    New service connects bands and brands

    fanatic.fm is a music sponsorship platform where brands and bands can find each other in a new way. Instead of paying for advertising spots on music destination sites, brands set up a pool of funds for a branding campaign and “invite” musicians that they feel best portray their brand values and image. Then it’s up to the invited musicians to accept or refuse the invitation (yep, you’re right! It works just like a friendship request on Facebook). A band and brand relationship is formed only when mutual consent is reached. Pretty cool! Don’t you think?

    But, what’s in it for the artists?

    The branding fund is allocated among the invited musicians based on the number of plays. Both parts have the incentive to engage their social media network to drive traffic to the newly formed relationship, creating a win-win scenario for both the band and the brand. Musicians take 70% of the total sponsorship revenue and fanatic.fm takes 30%. And then musicians and fanatic.fm donate 2.5% each to charities that musicians select to help them change the world.

    Yesterday Samsung started its first campaign on fanatic.fm, sponsoring Sydney Wayser’s album. This however doesn’t close the opportunity of other musicians to upload their songs and suggest sponsorship to Samsung as well.

    Ian Kwon, co-founder of fanatic.fm, comments on the service, “More and more brands are playing the role of content curators and music is great content to express a brand identity. We wanted to create a platform for those needs. The platform also provides a good way for bands to monetize their music streaming.”

    Print

    SOUNDS LIKE BRANDING SET FOR INTERNATIONAL RELEASE

    The international version of Sounds like Branding is licensed by publishing company A & C Black Publishers in UK, and Acorn Publishing in South Korea. In South Korea it will most likely be released in June, in Europe, US and the Commonwealth in July.

    cover-slb

    For more info, subscribe to our latest news (up to the right), or just continue to keep an eye on this blog.

    Interested in a beta version of the book? Subscribe here or just download it here.

    The Swedish version of Sounds like Branding is available for purchase here.

    Print

    Sonic Branding at MIDEM and beyond

    The value of a sound…sound strategy is still a dim second in advertising briefs but smarter brands are catching on. Audi achieved sonic branding two years ago, with its sport for the A5 sportback - a steady, pumping heartbeat, breath and a piano as seen (and heard) above.

    Via brandchannel. Read more here.

    Print

    Stir up some good old memories and the Baby Boomers might choose you

    Bob Dylan’s latest release “Stick With Mono” proves a propensity in the market for brands that stir up memories. The tendency most likely stems from a society where consumers want idealisations from the past, projecting their feelings on a more secure and stable ground compared to the uncertainty of the present and future.

    Music defines a generation. In regards to baby boomers, who could better represent or influence them like Bob Dylan, iconic and himself a baby boomer?

    With his music, Dylan successfully captured an important part of the baby boomer generation. His efforts to update himself is thus not so much about attracting new fans as it is about staying relevant to the baby boomer market. Rather than embarking on the continual search of youth, looking only at what’s new and novel, Dylan has been focusing on his loyal fans; the ones who grew up with him since he played with a electric guitar in Newport Folk Festival in 1963. A lot of brands would benefit from using the same strategy as Dylan, and stir up some good old memories.  Like a Bob Dylan fan once said; “One Sound, One Brain… One Bob!”

    By Fernando Gaspar at Brands Like Bands.

    (Wikipedia: A baby boomer is a person who was born during the Post-World War II baby boom.)

    Print

    The Experience of Nightlife Exchange Project

    On November 27 last year, Smirnoff set out to show how people from different cultures party, through its Nightlife Exchange Project. 14 countries were engaged in the swap project, and Smirnoff Facebook fans from all over the world contributed with their ideas on the specifics of their country’s nightlife. Together they created a great buzz and a memorable cross-cultural brand experience.

    The Nightlife Exchange Project kicked off with one week of TV advertising, calling on consumers around the world to visit a Smirnoff Facebook page and engage themselves in the project, by submitting their ideas about the best party night out in their country.

    14 countries; Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, India, Ireland, Lebanon, Poland, South Africa, Thailand, Venezuela, UK and United States, took part in the project. Each country was given a special curator who helped out in sorting and selecting the absolutely best party ideas among the most highly-rated Facebook submissions. Submissions could be anything across fashion, food, music and more. A blogger outreach programme was also launched, and Smirnoff tapped into mobiles with its own channel Smirnoff.mob. MTV, Smirnoff’s global tie-up partner, delivered on-air and online coverage of each stage of the project.

    There was a great buzz both before the party swap, as well as after. You don’t have to search the web for long to find comments such as “Definitely looking for the next party if there will be a second nightlife exchange!” and “Looking forward to the next and even bigger Smirnoff Event.”

    As Benjamin Hill, youth writer for MTV Sticky, puts it, “There is something priceless in what Smirnoff did in the sense that they didn’t just create events, they created an experience.” We can’t agree more. By creating an experience, Smirnoff has successfully tapped into the hearts of their consumers. The Nightlife Exchange Project was however not solely about experiences, but emotions, engagement and exclusivity as well.

    Many consumers probably wonder if Smirnoff is going to make a new party swap this year.

    Print

    Where do you put your app money?

    A recent Nielsen report shows that innovative channels such as mobile music apps and streaming services are very much appreciated by consumers all over the world.

    iphone-music-apps

    During September 2010, Nielsen conducted a survey of 26,644 online consumers in 53 markets. The survey, done exclusively for Midem, covered questions about music purchasing and listening habits.

    The results?

    Globally, artist apps, music-discovery apps and streaming apps are doing best. In the US, music apps are the second most popular apps, and the best performing apps in Europe are artist apps.

    As for online, the survey shows that free ad-funded and daily or monthly subscription models are the most popular, and more than half of online consumers say they would use a free service in exchange for listening to and watching ads.

    So, where do you put your online and app development money?

    Want to learn more? Get the Nielsen Music mobile apps and music streaming report for free on the Midem blog.

    Print