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    ABSOLUT and ‘Cee Lo Distilled’ part 1

    ABSOLUT Vodka has teamed up with rapper and record producer Cee Lo, to launch a two-part film about the rapper and his life. A teaser was released earlier this month, and this week, on the 27th of June, the spirits brand released the first part of the film, ’Cee Lo Distilled’ Part 1.

    The ’Cee Lo Distilled’ two-part film is taking viewers into the world of the celebrated rapper as he talks about his family and childhood, shares on what ‘being truly exceptional’ in today’s world of music means to him and what inspires and influences his work.

    ABSOLUT already teamed up with Jay-Z in March 2010, to release a 14-minute documentary, ‘NY-Z’ - An ABSOLUT Collaboration with Jay-Z, about his life and work. The Cee Lo film looks like just another music documentary at first glance, but it’s much more than that. Cee Lo has a unique charisma and musical talent, so the film is well worth seeing.

    The second and the final part of the documentary will go online on July 6.

    You can watch the film ‘NY-Z’ - An ABSOLUT Collaboration with Jay-Z here.

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    Decode Jay-Z with Bing

    Microsoft wanted its agency, Droga5, to help leverage the usage of the Bing search engine. To expand the search reach, Bing needed to become more culturally relevant and appeal to a younger audience. The launch of Jay-Z’s autobiography ‘Decoded’ was used to do this. The book’s 350 pages were individually placed in a plethora of different locations, over 13 cities all around the world. The chosen location for each page was contextually relevant to the page itself, meaning that you could literally walk through the life of Jay-Z. But the location of each page could only be found by using Bing search and maps.

    For the ‘Decode Jay-Z with Bing’ campaign agency Droga5 won both the Outdoor and Titanium and Integrated Grand Prix at Cannes Lions 2011.

    “We loved its bravery, its boldness, its innovation,” commented Cannes Lions’ Titanium and Integrated Jury President Bob Scarpelli, chairman of DDB Worldwide. “It’s immersive. It’s interactive. It’s creating conversations with customers. It gave millions a reason to use Bing. They put every page of Jay-Z’s new autobiography out in the world every day for a month in 13 major cities in the world. Fans could walk through J-Z’s life.”

    The unique partnership brought Bing to the forefront of pop-culture and gave millions of Jay-Z fans a reason to use Bing Search and Maps.

    The results, except from winning the Grand Prix for Outdoor as well as Titanium and Integrated at Cannes Lions 2011:

    • The average online player engagement was over 11 minutes per visit.
    • Jay-Z’s Facebook fans grew by one million during the campaign launch.
    • Decoded went straight to the New York Times Best Seller list at #2 its first week.
    • Bing.com saw an 11.7% increase in visits the month of the campaign (Bing’s only form of marketing during this period).
    • Bing.com entered the top ten most visited sites in the US.
    • Bing earned 1.1 billion global media impressions.
    • Bing’s ‘intent to use’ scores were higher than any other Bing marketing initiative ever according to ComScore. Online Buzz and Social metrics were above average for any Bing marketing program according to Nielsen BuzzMetrics.

    This project is truly an excellent example of how music branding can work when done correctly.

    Read more about the case and other Cannes Lions winners here.

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    A free excerpt of Sounds Like Branding for a tweet!

    slb_freechapterThe book Sounds Like Branding is an ‘ear-opening’ journey through the history of music and marketing, from the humble jingle and the advent of Muzak to Michael Jackson’s groundbreaking association with Pepsi in the 1980s and the music branding embraced today by global brands such as Nike, Starbucks, Levi’s and Coca-Cola.

    Interested in a sneak preview of the book? Download a free excerpt of Sounds Like Branding for a tweet and read about why you should market your brand through music, the music stairway, strategies for working with music and more!

    Get a free excerpt

    Sounds Like Branding is published by Bloomsbury Publishing Plc (A&C Black Publishers Ltd) in the UK on the 18th of July and can be pre-ordered below.
    Order Sounds Like Branding at Amazon.co.uk

    For more info about the book, check out The Book page.

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    Pre-order the English version of Sounds Like Branding

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    Everyone loves music, but not everyone loves advertising. Faced with increasingly impatient and fickle customers, some of the world’s most famous brands have been turning to music and artists to engage the public in a way they could never do alone. Why? Because music speaks to our emotions, brings people together and starts conversations. If used correctly, it can turn a one-off purchaser into a loyal fan.

    “Jakob Lusensky has done a great service to all marketers by writing Sounds Like Branding. Every company should have a music strategy. Some do; most don’t. This book shows you how. It’s a five step programme – a very short stairway to heaven.” - Kevin Roberts, CEO Worldwide, Saatchi & Saatchi

    Bloomsbury Publishing Plc (A&C Black Publishers Ltd) will publish the English version of Sounds Like Branding in the UK on the 18th of July.

    Order Sounds Like Branding at Amazon.co.uk

    For more info about the book, check out The Book page.

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    Exclusive survey on what impact music has on businesses in public places (in English) – Yours for a tweet or Facebook share

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    To better understand the impact of music on consumers and to learn more about the attitudes towards music being played in businesses in public places*, as well as music played in the workplace, Heartbeats International has conducted a survey on 1000 Swedes between the ages of 16-64. We asked them questions about the impact of music on their everyday lives, public places and at work.

    The survey results are published in the report, Uncovering a musical myth: A survey on music’s impact in public spaces. It is your for a tweet or Facebook share:



    Interested in the Swedish version of the report:
    Download your copy

    * Public places has been used as a generic term for businesses such as shops, shopping malls, supermarkets, restaurants, hotels, transportation services, sports stadiums, gyms and workplaces.

     

    TOPICS COVERED IN THE REPORT INCLUDE:

    • The importance of music for people in their everyday lives
    • The impact music has on businesses in public places
    • The impact music has on employees and workplaces

    Five truths about the impact of music:

    • People rank music as more difficult to live without than sports, movies and newspapers
    • Playing the right music in your business makes customers stay longer
    • Music played in your business affects your customers’ opinion about your brand
    • Music enhances wellbeing amongst employees in workplaces
    • People think it is important that artists, musicians and songwriters get paid for music being played in public places
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    The impact of music on businesses in public places #2

    The report, Myten om musik besannad: En undersökning om musikens betydelse för verksamheter i offentlig miljö (Uncovering a musical myth: A survey on music’s impact in public spaces) clearly shows that ’the right music’ has a positive impact on businesses in public places such as shops and restaurants. ’The right music’, being music that fits the brand or business profile, played at the right volume, making people stay longer, consume more and recommend your business to others. But what happens if a business plays music that is ’wrong’?

    When we conducted our survey on 1000 Swedes, we did not only ask about the positive impact of music but about the negative impact as well. We wanted to know the effect of ‘the wrong music’ being played and asked the respondents if music could make them leave a place, not come back, recommend others not to visit, or buy less, and why.

    We also asked people if they have ever been inspired by the music being played when visiting a business in a public place, and if this has introduced them to new music and artists. Some of the results are shown below.

    WRONG MUSIC PLAYED TOO LOUDLY MAKES CONSUMERS LEAVE

    We wanted to know if music can have a negative impact on businesses in public places. The results from our survey reveal that ‘the wrong music’ makes 44% of consumers and visitors leave a business and 38% won’t come back. And almost 4 out of 10 also say that ‘the wrong music’ makes them buy less.

    As many as 44% (almost every second person!) say that the music being played can, to a high or very high extent, cause them to leave. The important question to us was why? The answer being that people can leave a place if the music there is played at a too loud volume and is blocking the conversation or if the music being played is noisy and irritating.

    ‘The wrong music’ can make me…

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    The ones who leave a place do so because the music is…

    • 1  Played too loud / Blocking the conversation 52%
    • 2  Noisy / Irritating 44%

    What would happen if it was totally quiet in a business?

    32-41% of the respondents say they would react negatively or very negatively to silence, or more precisely the absence of music in a business such as a shop, restaurant, hairdresser or at the shopping mall. And more than 6 out of 10 of 16-24 year olds would react negatively or very negatively if a gym didn’t play music.

    This, together with some of the previous results we’ve published here, shows the importance for businesses not only to play music, but to play it right. That means looking over the music they play – with ‘the right music’ being music that is played at the right volume, matching the brand or business profile.

    Businesses as inspirational music sources

    We also wanted to know how much people notice the music being played in public. The survey reveals that public places work as a source of inspiration for many! More than half of 16-24 year olds have discovered new music as well as new artists when they have visited a business in a public place.

    More than half of 16-24 year olds have discovered new music in a shop or another business in a public place

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    And many also notice what artist or track it is that is being played. Almost 4 out of 10 16-24 year olds notice the artist or track categorically, and 13% even rate their experience of a business by the music that is played.

    How well do people notice the music that is played in public?

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    You find more results here.

    Download full report

    (Note: the full report is in Swedish but will soon be published in English)

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    The impact of music on businesses in public places #1

    Music is important for businesses in public places such as shops, restaurants and more. However, it’s not only important to play music. It’s important to play ‘the right music’, i.e. music that fits the brand or business profile, at the right volume. Then consumers will stay longer, re-visit, recommend your business to others as well as buy more from you. But music is not only of value for businesses in public places, it has a positive impact on workplaces as well; it makes workplaces more relaxed and your employees more productive.

    These are some of the results our survey reveals, conducted on 1000 Swedes between the ages of 16-64. The respondents in the survey have been asked questions about the impact of music on their everyday lives, public places and at work (public places is used as a generic term for businesses such as shops, shopping malls, supermarkets, restaurants, hotels, transportation services, sports stadiums, gym and workplaces).

    The results from the survey are published in a report in Swedish, Myten om musik besannad: En undersökning om musikens betydelse för verksamheter i offentlig miljö (Uncovering a musical myth: A survey on music’s impact in public spaces). Below are some of the results.

    The importance of music for people in their everyday lives

    As regards the importance of music to people, music is ranked as more difficult to live without in everyday life than sports, movies and newspapers. Music also beats TV, radio, arts and literature. Only Internet and mobile phones are ranked higher.

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    More than 6 out of 10 say that music is important or very important to them in their lives. As for 16-24 year olds, that figure rises to 74%.

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    The impact music has on businesses in public places

    As regards businesses, the survey reveals that ‘the right music’ makes almost 4 out of 10 stay longer in a business in a public place. That figure rises to 50% when it comes to 16-24 year olds. Further, 31% of all people return to a business in a public place which plays music that is appreciated by the visitor, or consumer. 21% recommend the business to others and 14% also say they buy more.

    What music is it that is appreciated then? Which music is ‘right’, from the consumers’ point of view?

    First and foremost, the music that is played in a shop or a restaurant for example, has to have the right volume. Secondly, it has to match the business’ profile, or brand. It is less important that the music corresponds to the consumers’ personal taste or that it hits the radio charts and they recognise it.

    It’s important or very important that the music played in a shop or at a restaurant…

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    The survey further reveals that ‘the wrong music’, as in noisy or irritating, makes 44% of consumers and visitors leave a business and 38% wont come back. Almost 4 out of 10 also say that ‘the wrong music’ makes them buy less.

    The impact music has on employees and workplaces

    As regards music in workplaces, more than 6 out of 10 people and as many as 8 out of 10 16-24 year olds listen to music everyday, or at least once a week when they’re at work.

    66% of those who listen to music everyday, or at least once a week, think that music affects them in a positive or very positive way at work. Almost 50% of the 16-24 years olds say they love to listen to music at work, and just as many say that music makes them more productive while they’re working. Further, 43% of all people say that music makes the work environment more relaxed. As regards 16-24 year olds, that figure rises to 56%.

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    You find more results here.

    Download full report

    (Note: the full report is in Swedish)

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    HEARTBEATS TREND REPORT : SEOUL

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    David Chang is a member of the Heartbeats Movement and founder of inmD Inc., the first and biggest social media marketing agency in Seoul, Korea. They work with many Korean leading brands, such as Samsung Imaging for social media marketing. David also leads the publishing of ‘Sounds like Branding’ in Korean. Below he shares his insights on marketing and social media with us.

    Get your copy of Heartbeats Trend Report : Seoul

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