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    New service connects bands and brands

    fanatic.fm is a music sponsorship platform where brands and bands can find each other in a new way. Instead of paying for advertising spots on music destination sites, brands set up a pool of funds for a branding campaign and “invite” musicians that they feel best portray their brand values and image. Then it’s up to the invited musicians to accept or refuse the invitation (yep, you’re right! It works just like a friendship request on Facebook). A band and brand relationship is formed only when mutual consent is reached. Pretty cool! Don’t you think?

    But, what’s in it for the artists?

    The branding fund is allocated among the invited musicians based on the number of plays. Both parts have the incentive to engage their social media network to drive traffic to the newly formed relationship, creating a win-win scenario for both the band and the brand. Musicians take 70% of the total sponsorship revenue and fanatic.fm takes 30%. And then musicians and fanatic.fm donate 2.5% each to charities that musicians select to help them change the world.

    Yesterday Samsung started its first campaign on fanatic.fm, sponsoring Sydney Wayser’s album. This however doesn’t close the opportunity of other musicians to upload their songs and suggest sponsorship to Samsung as well.

    Ian Kwon, co-founder of fanatic.fm, comments on the service, “More and more brands are playing the role of content curators and music is great content to express a brand identity. We wanted to create a platform for those needs. The platform also provides a good way for bands to monetize their music streaming.”

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    Sonic Branding at MIDEM and beyond

    The value of a sound…sound strategy is still a dim second in advertising briefs but smarter brands are catching on. Audi achieved sonic branding two years ago, with its sport for the A5 sportback - a steady, pumping heartbeat, breath and a piano as seen (and heard) above.

    Via brandchannel. Read more here.

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    Stir up some good old memories and the Baby Boomers might choose you

    Bob Dylan’s latest release “Stick With Mono” proves a propensity in the market for brands that stir up memories. The tendency most likely stems from a society where consumers want idealisations from the past, projecting their feelings on a more secure and stable ground compared to the uncertainty of the present and future.

    Music defines a generation. In regards to baby boomers, who could better represent or influence them like Bob Dylan, iconic and himself a baby boomer?

    With his music, Dylan successfully captured an important part of the baby boomer generation. His efforts to update himself is thus not so much about attracting new fans as it is about staying relevant to the baby boomer market. Rather than embarking on the continual search of youth, looking only at what’s new and novel, Dylan has been focusing on his loyal fans; the ones who grew up with him since he played with a electric guitar in Newport Folk Festival in 1963. A lot of brands would benefit from using the same strategy as Dylan, and stir up some good old memories.  Like a Bob Dylan fan once said; “One Sound, One Brain… One Bob!”

    By Fernando Gaspar at Brands Like Bands.

    (Wikipedia: A baby boomer is a person who was born during the Post-World War II baby boom.)

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    The sound of TRON LEGACY

    Walt Disney’s reproduction of legendary TRON features electronic and symphonic elements from the French techno duo Daft Punk, uniquely blended with futuristic sound effects. SoundWorks Collection is a platform and website that takes you behind the scenes, for a look into the audio post-production of films, video game sound design and original soundtrack composition. This video takes you into the sound design and creation of TRON LEGACY.

    SoundWorks Collection: The Sound of TRON LEGACY from Michael Coleman on Vimeo.

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    British Indie Musicians Depicted on Building Walls

    Footwear company Converse is well-known for its projects focusing on art, music and culture. This time they pay tribute to influential musicians by promoting indie music genres with street art.

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    Recently Converse partnered with graffiti collective Monorex to paint the city walls of the UK, paying tribute to influential British musicians such as Bernard Sumner and Paloma Faith, amongst others. London, Brighton, Manchester and Glasgow are getting their murals done.

    Converse also got indie artists to record four versions of the song Didn’t Know What Love Was. As well as that, they are putting on a series of free parties throughout the UK. The parties take inspiration from iconic genres of British music, from punk to Britpop to dubstep, with support from Vice.

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    Homeland Security and the shades of grey in piracy

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    Homeland Security have expanded their operations and besides terrorists they are now chasing music blogs as well. Even if quite a few record label executives might feel inclined to stick the T-label on the bloggers, this is still a change of pace for the war on copyright infringement.

    We initially intended to cover this when it happened a few weeks ago, but due to unclear circumstances and uncertainty concerning exactly what legal room Homeland Security operated under, it got temporarily shelved.

    This is still a very important issue for everyone who’s working professionally with music, so please take the time to read this article in New York Times, and the statement recently made by Eskay, owner of NahRight, one of the biggest music blogs.

    Let us know what your thoughts are on this!

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    How to make the best use of festival funding

    In a previous post, our friends at Splatter highlighted the benefits of brands involved with music festivals. Here they share some advice on how to make the best use of festival funding.

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    As Splatter mentioned in their previous post on Sounds Like Branding, brands can gain pretty much from being part of a music festival, e.g. engagement, storytelling, sampling opportunities and so forth. It is however up to the brands and their agencies to make the best use of a sponsorship and turn the fans into customers (or customers into fans, as we say at Heartbeats).

    The obvious question for a brand wanting to leverage off the passion created by music is: How do they pick through the options and ensure marketing spend is effectively used?

    According to Splatter, you should:

    1. Ensure that involvement in a music festival or music festivals is a part of a broader music based strategy. The consumers will smell the lack of authenticity if your presence at a music festival (for cool cred) isn’t backed up by relationships with artists, fans, online leverage, great use of music in retail A-T-L that incorporate music in some creative way.

    2. Work with a specialist that understands the market place and actually knows everything about the festivals, the music, the fans and the brands. There is a huge difference between the quality of festivals on offer, and you will save time and money by speaking to people that already know.

    3. Work with only established events (or at least credible and authentic ones, according to Heartbeats). If a promoter comes to you with a grand idea to run a festival, but they have no history of doing credible events, then be very cautious.

    4. Ensure that you have a plan for your participation involving detailed pre, onsite and post event creative, planning and execution. Leverage every step of the way. Get as much access to artists as possible, ensure you can use the festival in your own brand stories, get involved in the pre-event marketing campaign. Do some marketing of your own. Create content during the festival and spread it afterwards. Look for multi-year relationships, so you can build your brand alongside the festival as it grows.

    5. Get creative. If you think that slapping some logos around the festival grounds and having hot girrrrrlls in short skirts handing out samplers is all you have to do once you are at the festival, then think again. Creative and useful experiences allied to pre-event participation and continuous conversations can turn festival sponsorship into something truly valuable.

    6. Ensure you have pre-agreed metrics so you can measure your investment ROI.

    So, which festival would fit your brand you think?

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    Heartbeats Trend Report : New York

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    Eric Welles Nyström, who works with artist management and brand consulting for lifestyle companies in NYC, and is a member of Heartbeats Movement, has shared his insights about marketing trends in NYC with us. Read about Eric’s thoughts of shoe brand Keep’s recent marketing campaign, the future of marketing in general and ‘organic’ as a trend, as well as why music is becoming more and more important to reach the target consumer.

    Get your copy of Heartbeats Trend Report : New York

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